Thanks to everyone that has donated so far

1,745

daffodils are blooming

$64,108

to support people with cancer and their whānau

23,000

New Zealanders are diagnosed with cancer each year. You are supporting them.

What is Daffodil Day?

Daffodil Day symbolises hope for all New Zealanders impacted by cancer.

Since 1990, this iconic event has inspired people to come together and support the Cancer Society's work. As well as providing an opportunity to raise awareness of cancer in New Zealand.

Your donations will go towards providing a wide range of support services, education and awareness programmes plus fund vital research into the causes and treatment of all types of cancer.  

Thanks to our ANZ, our principal sponsor for supporting the work we do for 30 years. 

Make a difference

Donate today. Your generous donation will help make a difference for people with cancer.

Get involved

There are many different ways to get involved and show your support. Click the different options below to find out more.

Donate now

The street appeal in Auckland is cancelled. In all other parts of the country we will continue to organise street appeals while we are in Level 1 or 2.

Volunteering offers a wonderful opportunity to learn new skills, meet new people and support a worthy cause while having fun and making a difference.

Volunteers are essential to the success of Daffodil Day. The Cancer Society needs around 8,000 volunteers each year from throughout the country to help ensure Daffodil Day is a success.

To make a difference and volunteer for us click on the region you live on the map.

 

Click below for more helpful information about volunteering: 

An Introduction to Daffodil Day and the Cancer Society

Volunteer Info for Street Collection (Covid level 2)

You can for cancer 

You can for cancer is the Cancer Society's new community fundraising website. Everything you need to create a successful fundraiser can be found here - you'll find inspiring stories from communities all over Aotearoa, plenty of fun ideas, and downloadable resources to help you plan & promote your fundraiser.

Support Kiwis with cancer and their whānau today - You can for cancer!

 

If you have a different fundraising query, your local Cancer Society are always here to help. 

 

The Cancer Society sells beautiful bunches of fresh daffodils direct to your business or door step.

These blooms will add vibrant yellow colour to your reception, staff / board rooms and retail counters, or can be sent as gifts to your valued customers. As well as raising essential funds for the Cancer Society, these flowers will also help to raise awareness of Daffodil Day. 

Simply click on where you live on the map to submit your order.

  • Volunteer Volunteer
  • Fundraise Fundraise
  • Buy fresh flowers Fresh flowers

Shop

Support Daffodil Day by ordering Cancer Society products.

View all merchandise

Contact

Please fill out the form below and we'll get back to you.

Your details

Visit cancernz.org.nz for contact details of your local Cancer Society

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I have found there are a lot of inspirational quotes for during treatment, but not a lot for when life goes back to 'normal'. But as a survivor, life is never really normal again.

Watching sport with your whānau this weekend? The biggest competitor is the sun. Remember to slip, slip, slap, slop and wrap.

“I remember an appointment with my oncologist after several tough surgeries and 6 months of chemo. She said to me, “Andrew, I think you are depressed. ” And I was. I just didn’t know it.

Relay For Life registrations are open! Join us and celebrate cancer survivors and carers; remember loved ones lost to cancer and fight back to raise awareness and funds to support our work.

Did you know the Cancer Society works with schools to teach kids about staying sun safe? With around 500 New Zealanders dying of skin cancer each year, we think it's important to teach our tamariki how to be sun smart...

Every week we share one of the quotes that inspired or helped a member of our community during their cancer experience. We'd like to hear a quote that gave you hope during your (or a loved one's) cancer experience.

Any tan is a sign that your skin has been damaged, which increases your risk of skin cancer. Remember to slip, slop, slap, and wrap and don't forget to seek shade!

Did you know that it's a myth that people with dark skin or eyes don't have to worry about sunburn? Everyone, regardless of skin type and colour, is at risk of skin and eye damage.

Being positive has been my mantra, long before I was told I had ovarian cancer, back in June last year. My doctors told me a positive attitude would stand me in good stead, and it has.

Planning on going to the beach or for a swim this weekend?

Remember to apply a thick layer of sunscreen at least 20 minutes before going outside and reapply at least every 2 hours and after swimming or sweating.

My sister died peacefully a few months ago. She had been battling lung cancer. I was blessed to have had quality time with her. She was the bravest woman I know. Make the most of every moment.

Sun damage isn’t caused by temperature, it's caused by UV radiation. A cool or overcast day can have similar UV levels to a warm, sunny one.

"My hairdresser and I decided that blue was my new colour, so in went Manic Blue. Each time I washed it, the colour changed slightly. It went to purple and then to a lovely pink, which lasted the longest.

We'd like to wish you all a happy holiday season! Thank you for all your support during this difficult year. Together, we've continued to make a difference for the one in three New Zealanders affected by cancer.

Coping with cancer can be especially challenging during the holiday season. We asked Vicki, one of our supportive care nurses, for her number one tip for coping with cancer during the holidays.

The holiday season comes with lots of busyness and distractions, and sleep is often one of the first things to be compromised. But if you're coping with cancer - make sleep a priority.

"I just finished my 10th round of chemo. I'm so thankful that it got caught a few days before the surgeon said I wouldn’t have survived. He removed a very aggressive tumour and three-quarters of my bowel.

Here's one of our tips for coping with cancer this holiday season. Write down the things you would like to do during the holidays this year.

If you're coping with cancer, getting through the holiday season can be even more challenging. We've put together some tips to help you navigate the season.

12 years ago, I had a 5lb tumor around my left kidney. I wasn't aware of it and only went to the doctor because I was tired. A kidney and my squashed spleen were removed pronto.

What do friends and family need to know when caring for someone with cancer? We spoke to Andrea, one of our supportive care nurses, to find the answer.

"I was diagnosed with breast cancer almost a year ago, just 3 months after turning 40.

2020 has been a difficult year but that didn’t stop our dedicated volunteers from doing everything they could to support New Zealanders affected by cancer. Today is International Volunteer Day.

Since being diagnosed with melanoma, Ian is very careful to do everything he can to protect himself from the sun. Here's how Ian stays sun smart. #cancernz #sunsmart #summer #farming #cancersociety #cancersocietynz #cancerjourney #cancerawareness #cancercare #livingwithcancer #cancer #cancerstory #wellness

Did you know that over the next year we'll provide over 50,000 nights of accommodation for New Zealanders with cancer? This service makes accessing treatment easier for people who live far away from hospitals.